2) More action, action and action than in the entire Lovecraft's opus. Well, maybe a mutant between Carpenter, Herzog and Lynch would do a better job at capturing the 'madness' part of these mountains, but as things stand, he's the one holding the torch. Even if the storylines aren’t as dependent on each other as I would’ve liked, they’re all, for the most part, interesting. How could anybody get up that high to create anything, let alone live there? Everyone is a mixture of confused and fascinated. There’s usually a new surprise around every corner and most of those surprises are engaging and/or satisfying. With all possible pitfalls I mentioned (and some that I hadn't – like the WW2 allusions, which, for me, "Can you look around this world and believe in goodness of a god who rules it?! Briefly: it feels like a HELLBOY movie without Hellboy, with a light dose of Carpenter's THE THING. Those who expect a certain meaning and symbolism behind those "monsters" – those who expect philosophy – cosmic horror – loads of atmosphere, suspense, build-up... Well, not much of that, sadly. So onto shore they go. So after months of, you know, floating forward, they finally make it to Antarctica, and when the morning fog lifts, they’re baffled to find themselves surrounded by huge mountains. Lake could care less about all the weirdness. Here, that’s not the case. Copyright © ScriptShadow, 2012. That’s not to say I don’t like Del Toro. You'll have to pray to Azathoth that this film earns enough money for a much belated resurrection of Lovecraft at the movies. 1) There's relatively little stress on atmosphere. More creatures, increasingly weirder, are discovered on the mainland, along with something so terrifying it will change the very way we view life on this planet. The bigger picture they belong to is paid just a brief lip service, in a couple of lines of dialogue you might just miss while checking your text messages. The lesson? Much as Lovecraft was accused of not knowing when to stop, his balanced, mostly restrained prose and well-thought narrative from his masterwork is used here as a starting point for a non-plus-ultra in monster-exaggeration with very little subtlety preserved. So, once this gets made and you go to the theater (as you should! It seems like they discover the bas-reliefs with the Old Ones' history in the first building they come across, and that's it. Their goal? Also, that the Thing appearing at the end is not really Cthulhu (as it was labelled in the version I read), but that it is some other, nameless 'deity'. ©2020 Viacom International Inc. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. First, it is important to note that Ognjanovic comes across clearly as an unabashed fan of both Lovecraft's and del Toro's work. Of course, as we already know, most of them don’t make it. Jeremy Gordon Mar—05—2018 12:12PM EST. My issue is that none of the characters in the groups seems to know about or care about any of the other characters or what they’re doing. This script takes Lovecraft's concept of Shoggoths – large blobs of intelligent protoplasm which can assume any shape (including human) – and runs with it to lengths that Lovecraft never bothered with. Script link: At The Mountains Of Madness (This script is meant for educational purposes only. You need those carefully placed scenes in a story like this where the leader of the group, whoever she/he may be at the moment, makes it clear to both the characters in the story, and to us, the audience, what the current plan is, how long it’s supposed to take, who’s doing what and why, and where they plan to meet back up after it’s over. Yet even with del Toro directing, James Cameron producing, and Tom Cruise attached to star, Universal Pictures balked at the price tag and R rating del Toro insisted was necessary to tell the story properly. To sum up: it all depends on your expectations. novel into a rollercoaster monster romp, well, tough luck. Here's a link to the complete story for those who haven't read it:http://www.dagonbytes.com/thelibrary/lovecraft/mountainsofmaddness.htmDejan, you run a great site; keep up the good work!--Ivan. This last detail (if you can consider the mountain-sized monster – a detail!) Horror, Darkness and Weirdness in Film and Literature. He wants to explore and he wants to do it pronto. I can’t say I peruse through 1930s literature much. In this version, it si somewhat simplified into: Scientists go to Antarctica, resurrect primaeval monsters, mayhem ensues. There’s something beyond disturbing about 8 foot tall blind penguins that just stand there and do nothing. In this film, they are a perfect alibi for countless scenes of cool monster action – those blobs swallowing, partly digesting and re-creating humans (and dogs) into shapes nature never intended. Does anyone know who the production designer / art director will be? is not only incongruous but downright stupid. I hear the same threats on an average Santa Monica street corner, but something tells me Dyer’s spittin truth. Lovecraft for the big screen. About: So in light of Del Toro recently dropping out of The Hobbit, I decided to review one of his older and more beloved scripts, At The Mountains of Madness, based off of H.P. Much as Lovecraft was accused of not knowing when to stop, his balanced, mostly restrained prose and well-thought narrative from his masterwork is used here as a starting point for a non-plus-ultra in monster-exaggeration with very little subtlety preserved. Lovecraft was forced to publish most of his works in pulp magazines, but his best work (such as AT THE MOUNTAINS OF MADNESS) is most definitely NOT pulp fiction. This is a script that he wrote (okay, co-wrote) and intends to direct. Damn those pulps!). It’s 1939 in Tasmania when the whaling ship “The Arkham” appears seemingly out of nothingness, abandoned and barely aflaot. But almost immediately, they’re met with the first strange creatures of this world, 8 foot tall blind albino penguins that just…stand there. To use the reviewer's own words, "it feels like a 'Hellboy' movie without Hellboy, with a light dose of [John] Carpenter's 'The Thing. With greater interest for his stuff among the movie audiences, who knows, maybe someone, some day, will conceive and produce a truly Lovecraftian film which will not be pulp – a film to capture Lovecraft's spirit, not just creatures? Which leaves us with the question – how did the group meet their fate? Of course, it is told to the chief of the new expedition going there… This being a classic, I guess there's no need for going too much into details, you know the plot. As a result, the storylines feel self-contained, almost like vignettes, instead of parts of a larger whole. With all possible pitfalls I mentioned (and some that I hadn't – like the WW2 allusions, which, for me, diminish the timeless horrors of Lovecraft to a historically superseded and all-too-human nazi horror), Del Toro's film is still the best chance Lovecraftian cinema has to break through from the confines of schlocky B-movies. I wanted to see more of the deserted city of the Old Ones! To sum up: it all depends on your expectations. It’s only natural that a team would approach a problem in such a manner.

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