[2] Livy records that Aristodemus became Tarquinius' heir, and in 492 BC, when Roman envoys travelled to Cumae to purchase grain, Aristodemus seized the envoys' vessels in response to the Romans' having seized the property of Tarquinius at the time of Tarquinius' exile. However, because Eurytus did turn back and died in combat, Aristodemus was regarded as a coward and subjected to humiliation and disgrace at the hands of his compatriots; in the words of Herodotus, "no man would give him a light for his fire or speak to him; he was called Aristodemus the Coward." A character named Dilios appears in and partly narrates Frank Miller's 1998 graphic novel 300, which retells the events of the Battle of Thermopylae. This turned out to be the battle of Plataea, just one year after Thermopylae. As a strategos, he twice defeated Etruscan armies. Unlike Aristodemus, Dilios is not ordered home because of infection, although he does lose an eye in combat. Aristodemos is later mentioned as being one of the three hundred selected to accompany Leonidas to hold up the Persian army at the Hot Gates. The character also appears in the sequel, where he follows Queen Gorgo into battle and fights alongside her and Themistocles. It was so that he can use his oratorial skills to tell the story of his comrades in order to inspire the rest of Sparta, and then all of Greece. His work changed the direction of Western learning and continues to play a … Little is known of him other than the fact that he was sent home to Sparta because of an eye infection; was shunned by his fellow Spartans upon his return; and later charged into battle blindly into battle at Platea. Finally, Aristodemos's shameful treatment upon his return to Sparta is recalled, as well as his redemption by the heroic way he fought at Plataea. pp. Although they removed the black mark against his name, they would not award him any special honors for his valour because he had fought with recklessness; the Spartans having regarded as more valorous those who fought while still wishing to live. In the 2006 movie adaptation of the same name, Dilios was portrayed by David Wenham. He was assassinated by the aristocratic faction around 490 BC. Aristodemos is the main figure in Caroline Snedeker's popular historical novel The Coward of Thermopylae (1911), retitled in 1912 as The Spartan. Despite their refusal to surrender, Tommie presents a golden goblet as a gift to the Greeks, handing it to Aristodemos who in turn passes it to Leonidas. His own philosophy is equally obscure. [1][2][3] Born to a distinguished family, Aristodemus was appointed a strategos. Born to a distinguished family, Aristodemus was appointed a strategos. [1] However, because Eurytus did turn back and died in combat, Aristodemus was regarded as a coward and subjected to humiliation and disgrace at the hands of his compatriots; in the words of Herodotus, "no man would give him a light for his fire or speak to him; he was called Aristodemus the Coward. Aristodemus charged, berserker-like, out of the phalanx and fought, in the opinion of Herodotus, with the most bravery of all the Spartans before falling in battle.[6]. In the 2007 movie adaptation of the same name, Dilios is portrayed by David Wenham. [3], Around 490 BC the exiled nobles and their sons, supported by Campanians and mercenaries, were able to take possession of Cumae, and took cruel vengeance on Aristodemus and his family. He is the man which Dilios is inspired by. The three of them survive the events of the film. Understandably, Aristodemus sought to attain a glorious death at the very next opportunity presented to him. It was so that he can use his oratorial skills to tell the story of his comrades in order to inspire the rest of Sparta, and then all of Greece. Although they removed the black mark against his name, they did not award him any special honors for his valour because he had fought with suicidal recklessness; the Spartans regarded as more valorous those who fought while still wishing to live. Following Socrates and Plato, Aristotle had a great wealth of knowledge and wisdom to build upon, but he left no successor who could surpass him. 304. The Greek historian Herodotus believed that had both Aristodemus and Eurytus returned alive, or had Aristodemus alone been ill and excused from combat, the Spartans would have ascribed no blame to Aristodemus. As such, he faces no prejudice from his comrades on his return, and is later seen leading the Spartan army into battle at Plataea. Reserve Officers' Training Corps (Philippines), People of the American Civil War by state, Articles incorporating text from Wikipedia, https://military.wikia.org/wiki/Aristodemus_of_Sparta?oldid=3744452. He secured his power by surrounding himself with a strong bodyguard and by recruiting mercenaries. Aristodemos appears as a recurring background character in Steven Pressfield's 1998 novel Gates of Fire. Aristodemus (Greek: Ἀριστόδημος, died 479 BC) was a Spartan warrior, one of the many sent to the Battle of Thermopylae. Aristodemus of Sparta was a Spartan, mentioned in Herodotus' account of the Battle of Thermopylae.

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